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A Fantastic Woman

A Fantastic woman

Marina is a young woman working as a waitress and aspires to be a singer. She’s in love with Orlando, 20 years her senior. After celebrating Marina’s birthday Orlando falls seriously ill and passes away just after arriving at the hospital. Instead of being able to mourn her lover, Marina is put under suspicion and seen as untrustworthy by Orlando’s doctors and family. Marina is a trans woman and for most of Orlando’s family, her sexual identity is an aberration, so now she has to struggle for the right to be herself, going through a battle against the same forces she’s spent a lifetime fighting to become the woman she is now. A Complex, forthright, and fantastic woman.

Acclaimed director Sebastián Lelio follows up the success of Gloria with another celebration and examination of a female character, equaling the best of such directors as Pedro Almadóvar. A Fantastic Woman premiered in competition at the Berlin Film Festival to great acclaim. Produced by Pablo Larráin and Maren Ade, the film has been picked up by Sony Picture Classics for distribution in the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zeeland.  

Director: Sebastián Lelio

Production Countries: Chile, German, USA, Spain

Language: Spanish 

Running Time: 100 min

Cast: Daniela Vega, Francisco Reyes, Luis Gnecco

It may be a timely film, but it is its timelessness, as well as its depths of compassion, that qualify it as a great one. Five Stars.
— The Guardian
Lelio has crafted perhaps the most resonant and empathetic screen testament to the everyday obstacles of transgender existence since Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” in 1999.
— Variety
This is acting at its most fearless. A powerful drama.
— The Hollywood Reporter